Mass Media And Children Term Paper

Research Papers - The Effects of Media Influence and Screen Culture on the Developing Child

Below you will find a number of articles and research documents relating to 'The Effects of Media Influence and Screen Culture on the Developing Child'.

Please choose one of the four categories below or on the left and click on the icon to open a pdf document that you can save or print (or follow the link to another site).

DOWNLOADDATE ADDEDRESEARCH PAPER / ARTICLEKEYWORDS
September 2010Time Well Spent? Relating Television Use to Children's Free-Time Activities.
by Elizabeth A. Vandewater, PhDa,b,c,d,David S. Bickham, PhDb,c,d, June H. Lee, PhDb,c
Child development, Children, Media, Television
September 2010Document: APA Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualisation of Girls.
by Professor Zurbriggen
Girls, Sexualisation, Media, Advertising, Television
September 2010Early Television Exposure and Subsequent Attention Problems in Children, American Academy of Pediatrics, Volume 113, April 2006.
by Dimitri A. Christakis, MD, MPH; Frederick J. Zimmerman, PhD; David L. DiGiuseppe, MSc; Carolyn A. McCarty, PhD from Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Child Health Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Department of Health Services, Seattle, Washington; Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, Seattle, Washington
ADHD, Screen, Children, Attention, Television viewing
September 2010Psychological Distress; Television Viewing and Physical Activity in Children aged 4 to 12, American Academy of Pediatrics, Volume 122, 5 May 2009.
by Mark Hamer, PhD, Emmanuel Stamatakis, PhD, Gita Mishra, PhD from Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom
Aggressive behaviour, TV, Screen exposure, Sedentary, Physical activity, Mental health, Depression, Children
September 2010Television Viewing Habits and Sleep Disturbance in School Children, American Academy of Pediatrics, Volume 104, 3 September 1999.
by Judith Owens, Rolanda Maxim, Melissa McGuinnDagger, Chantelle NobileDagger, Michael Msall, and Anthony Alario - from the Departments of Pediatrics and Dagger, Child and Family Psychiatry, Hasbro Children's Hospital and Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, Rhode Island.
Television, sleep
2009WELL CONNECTED - the biological implications of social networking.
by Dr Aric Sigman. Sigman, A. (2009) Volume 56 Number 1, February 2009 | Biologist
Social networking, computer, social connection, mortality, television, brain development, children, attentional problems
2008'WELL CONNECTED' - effects of the integrated learning environment.
(Ruskin Mill Educational Trust) Sigman, A. (2008) Volume 56 Number 1, February 2009 | Biologist
Autism, aspergers syndrome, social behaviour, mental health, role modelling, mentoring, television, computers

WREN is an activity of ECSWE which is registered in Brussels, Belgium: ASBL 60732003. Registered address; Rue du Thrône 194, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium.

The Impact of Media on Children Essay

2305 Words10 Pages

In today’s society, there are a number of factors that affect a child’s ability to learn. The media, for good and for bad, is the primary teacher of American youth. This environment reflects life itself, sometimes in a corrupt way, including the positive and heinous parts, along with the beautiful and hideous parts, as well as the charitable and violent parts. It is almost impossible to protect American youth from experiences reflecting the adult world when the media invades homes and becomes so much a part of everyday living. “American teenagers spend 31 hours a week watching television, 10 hours a week online, 4 hours a week reading magazines, and 17 hours a week listening to music” (Miss). Even though mass media is a huge part of a…show more content…

In today’s society, there are a number of factors that affect a child’s ability to learn. The media, for good and for bad, is the primary teacher of American youth. This environment reflects life itself, sometimes in a corrupt way, including the positive and heinous parts, along with the beautiful and hideous parts, as well as the charitable and violent parts. It is almost impossible to protect American youth from experiences reflecting the adult world when the media invades homes and becomes so much a part of everyday living. “American teenagers spend 31 hours a week watching television, 10 hours a week online, 4 hours a week reading magazines, and 17 hours a week listening to music” (Miss). Even though mass media is a huge part of a child’s learning process and has benefits like the ability to expand their education on the world and the ways of society, more often it offers a poor form of socialization with no opportunity for physical interaction and negatively affects a child’s cognitive and social development by introducing him/her to adulthood at an early age through the constant issues of stereotypes, sexism, and violence that occur within American society.
The first two years of a child’s life is a critical time for their brain development (How). Television as well as other forms of media, in moderation, can be an wonderful educator and entertainer for American youth (How). Although, media often gets in the way of children exploring their surroundings as well as

Show More

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *