Cover Sheet For University Essay

MLA Format in Detail

This page contains general guidelines on how to properly format the headings on a paper using MLA format.

Without a Cover Page:

This is the most common way to begin an MLA essay because MLA does not require a cover page. Some instructors, however, may require one (see instructions and example below).

1. The Opening Page:
On the opening page or the first page, a comprehensive identification (sometimes referred to as the main heading) and essay title should appear. The identification includes the following information:

  • Student/Author Name
  • Instructor’s Name
  • Class Name/Information
  • Your Paper’s Due Date

Settings:

  • Font: choose an easy to read font such as Times New Roman
  • Font Size: set the font size to be 12 throughout the paper, including the paper’s title. Never set the font size larger than 12.
  • Margins: 1-inch for top/bottom/right/left throughout the paper
  • Double-space: double-space throughout he paper. Don’t add extra spaces (besides the already used double-spacing) between headings, title and/ paragraphs.  Important Note: In the newest Microsoft Word settings, adding extra spaces between paragraphs is a default setting and must be disabled by the writer; otherwise, extra spaces will be automatically created. 

Sample of the opening page:

With a Cover Page:

The Modern Language Association (MLA) does not require a cover page, but some instructors may require it. In certain situations or assignments, a paper with a cover page can look more professional.

Instructors who require the paper to have a cover page usually provide specific instructions on what should be included. Here is the general MLA Format cover page. This page should include your school or university’s name (i.e. Aims Community College), a paper title, author name, class name, professor name and paper due date.
Here is how to format an MLA cover page:

  • This page is double-spaced and the letters are centered.
  • Type the name of your university or college.
  • Skip to about one-third of the page and type the research paper title, including subtitle if there is one.
  • Skip several lines and type student/author name, course name and number, instructor name and paper due date.

Sample MLA Format Cover Page:

Sample MLA Format Cover Page

Alternate First Page:

If an instructor requires a cover page, the identification heading on the first page should be omitted. Below is an example of the first page if a cover page is used. Last name and page number should appear on all pages, and the title should appear at the top of the first page only.

Sample MLA Format First Page with Cover Page


2. The Inner Pages:
For the pages that follow the first page, set the heading like this: instead of the whole heading, use the header feature in the word-processing program to include author last name and page number.

Inner Page Example:

Example of the heading for inner pages.

3. The Works Cited Page:
Every research paper must include a works cited page(s).

  • The works cited list is placed at the end of the paper, beginning on a new page.
  • The header for the works cited page(s) should be similar to the header for the inner pages, which includes author name and the page number at the top.
  • Enter the title as “Works Cited” and place this title 1-inch from the top of the page, see more details in the example illustration below.

Example of the works cited page:

Example of the works cited page.

For moreiInformation on MLA works cited pages, including in-depth instructions for citing various sources, view MLA Works Cited Page.

Writing Cover Letters

What is a cover letter?


To be considered for almost any position, you will need to write a letter of application. Such a letter introduces you, explains your purpose for writing, highlights a few of your experiences or skills, and requests an opportunity to meet personally with the potential employer.

Precisely because this letter is your introduction to an employer and because first impressions count, you should take great care to write an impressive and effective letter. Remember that the letter not only tells of your accomplishments but also reveals how effectively you can communicate.

The appropriate content, format, and tone for application letters vary according to the position and the personality of the applicant. Thus you will want to ask several people (if possible) who have had experience in obtaining jobs or in hiring in your field to critique a draft of your letter and to offer suggestions for revision.

Despite the differences in what constitutes a good application letter, the suggestions on these pages apply generally.

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What to include in a cover letter

  • Try to limit your letter to a single page. Be succinct.

  • Assess the employer's needs and your skills. Then try to match them in the letter in a way that will appeal to the employer's self-interest.

  • As much as possible, tailor your letter to each job opportunity. Demonstrate, if possible, some knowledge of the organization to which you are applying.

  • Write in a style that is mature but clear; avoid long and intricate sentences and paragraphs; avoid jargon. Use action verbs and the active voice; convey confidence, optimism, and enthusiasm coupled with respect and professionalism.

  • Show some personality, but avoid hard-sell, gimmicky, or unorthodox letters. Start fast; attract interest immediately. For more information see Business Letter Format.

  • Arrange the points in a logical sequence; organize each paragraph around a main point.

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How to organize a cover letter


Below is one possible way to arrange the content of your cover letter.

Opening Paragraph

State why you are writing.

Establish a point of contact (advertisement in a specific place for a specific position; a particular person's suggestion that you write): give some brief idea of who you are (a Senior engineering student at UW; a recent Ph.D. in History).

Paragraph(s) 2(-3)

Highlight a few of the most salient points from your enclosed resume.

Arouse your reader's curiosity by mentioning points that are likely to be important for the position you are seeking.

Show how your education and experience suit the requirements of the position, and, by elaborating on a few points from your resume, explain what you could contribute to the organization.

(Your letter should complement, not restate, your resume.)

Closing paragraph

Stress action. Politely request an interview at the employer's convenience.

Indicate what supplementary material is being sent under separate cover and offer to provide additional information (a portfolio, a writing sample, a sample publication, a dossier, an audition tape), and explain how it can be obtained.

Thank the reader for his/her consideration and indicate that you are looking forward to hearing from him/her.

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Questions to guide your writing

  • Who is my audience?

  • What is my objective?

  • What are the objectives and needs of my audience?

  • How can I best express my objective in relationship to my audience's objectives and needs?

  • What specific benefits can I offer to my audience and how can I best express them?

  • What opening sentence and paragraph will grab the attention of my audience in a positive manner and invite them to read further?

  • How can I maintain and heighten the interest and desire of the reader throughout the letter?

  • What evidence can I present of my value to my audience?

  • If a resume is enclosed with the letter, how can I best make the letter advertise the resume?

  • What closing sentence or paragraph will best assure the reader of my capabilities and persuade him or her to contact me for further information?

  • Is the letter my best professional effort?

  • Have I spent sufficient time drafting, revising, and proofreading the letter?

  • *From Ronald L. Kraunich, William J. Bauis. High Impact Resumes & Letters. Virginia Beach, VA: Impact Publications, 1982.

     

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How to format a cover letter

  • Type each letter individually, or use a word processor.

  • Use good quality bond paper.

  • Whenever possible, address each employer by name and title.

  • Each letter should be grammatically correct, properly punctuated, and perfectly spelled. It also should be immaculately clean and free of errors. Proofread carefully!

  • Use conventional business correspondence form. If you are not certain of how to do this, ask for help at the Writing Center.

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For further information on cover letters contact the Career Advising and Planning Services and take a look at our workshp on Writing Resumes and Cover Letters (NB: this course not offered during the summer).

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