Classics Concerning Essay Human Penguin Understanding

The career of the Scottish philosopher David Hume is a parable of the writing life that speaks with eloquence about the strange and inexplicable progress of ideas in the marketplace of free debate. His career, moreover, is one that runs almost to the day he died, in 1776, just after the outbreak of the American revolution.

Hume was born and educated in Edinburgh, the son of a successful lawyer, and acquired a fierce appetite for philosophy at a precociously young age. After a mental breakdown as a student, and despite limited personal means, he spent three years of private study in France. Thereafter, he worked for four years on A Treatise of Human Nature. It was his first major work as a philosopher, and it bore the unwieldy subtitle “Being an Attempt to Introduce the Experimental Method of Reasoning into Moral Subjects”.Hume completed Treatise in 1738, aged 28, and published it anonymously in two volumes the following year.

His ambitious intention was to construct a pragmatic science of man, a wholesale system of thought by which to appraise the psychological basis of human nature. In opposition to the rationalists of the day, Hume argued that it was passion rather than reason that moderates human behaviour: “Reason is, and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can never pretend to any other office than to serve and obey them.”

From this position, Hume advanced the idea that human knowledge must ultimately be located in mankind’s quotidian experience. “It is not contrary to reason to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the scratching of my finger,” he wrote.

The publication of Hume’s Treatise was a disaster. Its wit and clarity (“Poets… though liars by profession, always endeavour to give an air of truth to their fictions”) were overlooked; his majestic philosophical rigour misunderstood. He himself later observed that it “fell dead-born from the press”. Today, however, Treatise is widely considered to be Hume’s most important work, one of the keystone books of western philosophy, in the words of one commentator, “the founding document of cognitive science” and possibly the “most important philosophical work” in the English language.

In 1740, however, the critics were savage, describing his work as “abstract and unintelligible”. It’s not hard to see why. Even today, the Treatise is notably dry, and makes few concessions to the reader.

Organised in three parts (Of the Understanding, Of the Passions and Of Morals), with many sub-sections such as “Of Ideas, Their Origin, Composition, Connexion, Abstraction, Etc.”; “Of the Ideas of Space and Time”; “Of Knowledge and Probability” and “Of the Sceptical and Other Systems of Philosophy Etc”, it concludes with a recapitulation with Hume’s reasoning for his thesis that “sympathy is the chief source of moral distinctions”.

As the first reviews suggest, the Treatise is not for the faint-hearted. This passage is typical: “After the most accurate examination of which I am capable, I venture to affirm that the rule here holds without any exception, and that every simple idea has a simple impression, which resembles it, and every simple impression a correspondent idea.”

Hume did not repine. He had devoted most of his savings to the long gestation of the work, and he would not give up. Addressing his restricted circumstances, he declared that he would dedicate himself to literature. He would, he wrote, “make a very rigid frugality supply my deficiency of fortune, to maintain unimpaired my independency”. With stoic self-belief he pronounced “every object contemptible except the improvements of my talents in literature”. And so, despite his bad press, and the frustration of his youthful ambition, Hume concluded: “Being naturally of a cheerful temper, I soon recovered from the blow and prosecuted with great ardour my studies in the country.”

With impressive sang froid, having determined that the problem with the Treatise was one of style not content, Hume reworked his material into two rather more accessible essays entitled An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (1748) and An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals (1751). These, Hume wrote, with typical brio, were “of all my writings, historical, philosophical, or literary, incomparably the best”. Next, in 1752, he published his Political Discourses, which was translated into French and made Hume famous throughout Europe. Now on a roll, in 1754 he published the brilliant first volume of his History of Great Britain, a narrative largely devoted to the early Stuart kings followed by further volumes in 1757, 1759, and 1762.

Always a great stylist, Hume was now established as one of the great intellects of his time, a cultural icon, renowned as much in London as in Scotland. Forever in search of new kinds of self-expression, at the end of his life, and conscious that he was dying, Hume published a short autobiographical essay on “My Own Life” in which he summarised his entire life in “fewer than 5 pages” – a genre that almost amounts to a private joke, being notably short on personal anecdote and standard autobiographical data. Dry as ever, he writes dispassionately of his imminent decease: “I now reckon upon a speedy dissolution. I have suffered very little pain from my disorder, and what is more strange, notwithstanding the great decline of my person, never suffered a moment’s abatement of my spirits.”

However, Hume did confess that a “love of literary fame” had served as his “ruling passion” in life. With his usual self-confidence, he claimed that this ambition “never soured my temper, notwithstanding my frequent disappointments”. The reception of the Treatise was one of these, he admitted, but the success of his subsequent Essays had preserved his good spirits. “That work was favourably received, and soon made me entirely forget my former disappointment,” he said.

In a line that many contemporary writers might profitably take to heart, he observed, of the Treatise, that his philosophical debut’s immediate failure “had proceeded more from the manner than the matter”. Hume explained his meaning thus: “I had been guilty of a very usual indiscretion, in going to the press too early.”

A signature sentence

“In every system of morality, which I have hitherto met with, I have always remarked that the author proceeds for some time in the ordinary way of reasoning, and establishes the being of a god, or makes observations concerning human affairs; when of a sudden I am surprized [sic] to find that instead of the usual copulations of proposition, is and is not, I meet with no proposition that is not connected with an ought or an ought not; this change is imperceptible, but it is, however, of the last consequence.”

Three to compare

Thomas Hobbes: Leviathan (1651)

John Locke: An Essay Concerning Human Understanding(1689)

David Hume: History of Great Britain (1754)

A Treatise of Human Nature by David Hume is published by Penguin Classics (£14.99). To order a copy for £12.74 go to guardianbookshop.com or call 0330 333 6846. Free UK p&p over £10, online orders only. Phone orders min p&p of £1.99

This article needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information.(April 2017)

This is a list of books published as Penguin Classics.

In 1996, Penguin Books published as a paperback A Complete Annotated Listing of Penguin Classics and Twentieth-Century Classics (ISBN 0-14-771090-1).

This article covers editions in the series: black label (1970s), colour-coded spines (1980s), and the most recent editions (2000s).

By title[edit]

A[edit]

B[edit]

  • Babur Nama: Journal of Emperor Babur
  • The Bacchae and Other Plays (Ion, The Women of Troy, Helen) by Euripides
  • The Barber of Seville by Pierre Beaumarchais
  • Barlaam and Josaphat: A Christian Tale of the Buddha by Gui de Cambrai
  • Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope
  • Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens
  • Baudelaire in English
  • Bayou Folk by Kate Chopin
  • Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me by Richard Fariña
  • The Beast Within by Émile Zola
  • The Beggar's Opera by John Gay
  • Behind the Scenes by Elizabeth Keckley
  • Bel-Ami by Guy de Maupassant
  • The Bell by Iris Murdoch
  • Beowulf: A Glossed Text
  • Beowulf: A Prose Translation
  • Beowulf: A Verse Translation
  • La Bête Humaine by Émile Zola
  • The Betrothed by Alessandro Manzoni
  • Between Past and Future by Hannah Arendt
  • Beyond Good and Evil by Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The Bhagavad Gita
  • The Bible (King James, Authorized Version of 1611) edited by David Norton
  • Billy Budd and Other Tales (including Bartleby, the Scrivener and Benito Cereno) by Herman Melville
  • The Birds and Other Plays (The Knights, Peace, The Assemblywomen and Wealth) by Aristophanes
  • The Birth of Tragedy by Friedrich Nietzsche
  • The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • Black Lamb and Grey Falcon by Rebecca West
  • The Black Prince by Iris Murdoch
  • The Black Sheep by Honoré de Balzac
  • The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas
  • The Blazing World and Other Writings by Margaret Cavendish
  • Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  • The Blithedale Romance by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • Blood, Toil, Tears and Sweat: The Great Speeches by Winston Churchill
  • Bodily Secrets by William Trevor
  • Bonjour Tristesse and A Certain Smile by Francoise Sagan
  • The Book of Chuang Tzu
  • The Book of the City of Ladies by Christine de Pizan
  • The Book of Contemplation: Islam and the Crusades by Usama ibn Munqidh
  • The Book of the Courtier by Baldassare Castiglione
  • The Book of Dede Korkut
  • The Book of Disquiet by Fernando Pessoa
  • The Book of Imaginary Beings by Jorge Luis Borges
  • The Book of Margery Kempe by Margery Kempe
  • The Book of Master Mo by Mo Zi
  • The Book of Mormon translated by Joseph Smith, Jr.
  • The Bostonians by Henry James
  • The Bounty Mutiny by William Bligh and Edward Christian
  • Brand by Henrik Ibsen
  • The Bride of Lammermoor by Walter Scott
  • Brighton Rock by Graham Greene
  • Brigitta and Other Tales by Adalbert Stifter
  • Brodie's Report by Jorge Luis Borges
  • The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Buddhist Scriptures
  • Burning Bright by John Steinbeck
  • A Burnt-Out Case by Graham Greene
  • But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes by Anita Loos
  • By the Open Sea by August Strindberg

C[edit]

  • Caleb Williams by William Godwin
  • The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories by H. P. Lovecraft
  • The Call of the Wild, White Fang, and Other Stories by Jack London
  • The Campaigns of Alexander by Arrian
  • Can You Forgive Her? by Anthony Trollope
  • Candide by Voltaire
  • Cannery Row by John Steinbeck
  • The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer
  • The Canterbury Tales: The First Fragment by Geoffrey Chaucer
  • Capital, Volume I; Capital, Volume II; and Capital, Volume III by Karl Marx
  • Captain Blood by Rafael Sabatini
  • Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling3
  • Carpenter's Gothic by William Gaddis
  • The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole
  • Castle Rackrent by Maria Edgeworth
  • Cavalleria Rusticana and Other Stories by Giovanni Verga
  • La Celestina (The Spanish Bawd) by Fernando de Rojas
  • A Celtic Miscellany translated by Kenneth Hurlstone Jackson
  • Chance by Joseph Conrad
  • Characters by Jean de la Bruyère
  • Charlotte Temple and Lucy Temple by Susanna Rowson
  • The Charterhouse of Parma by Stendhal
  • Chattering Courtesans and Other Sardonic Sketches by Lucian
  • Childhood, Boyhood, Youth (Leo Tolstoy novel) by Leo Tolstoy
  • A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings by Charles Dickens
  • Chronicle of the Narváez Expedition by Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca
  • Chronicles by Jean Froissart
  • Chronicles of the Canongate by Walter Scott
  • Chronicles of the Crusades by Jean de Joinville and Geoffrey of Villehardouin
  • Chung Yung
  • Cicero's Letters to Atticus by Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • The Cid, Cinna, The Theatrical Illusion by Pierre Corneille
  • The Cistercian World: Monastic Writings of the Twelfth Century
  • City of God by St.Augustine
  • Civil Disobedience by Henry David Thoreau
  • The Civil War by Julius Caesar
  • The Civil Wars by Appian
  • Clarissa by Samuel Richardson
  • The Classic of Mountains and Seas
  • Classical Literary Criticism
  • Clotel, or The President's Daughter by William Wells Brown
  • The Cloud of Unknowing and Other Works
  • Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
  • Collected Poems by Arthur Rimbaud
  • Collected Stories by Vladimir Nabokov
  • Colonial American Travel Narratives
  • The Comedians by Graham Greene
  • The Comedies: Adelphoe, Andria, Eunuchus, Heauton Timorumenos, Hecyra and Phormio by Terence
  • The Conquest of Gaul by Julius Caesar
  • Common Sense by Thomas Paine
  • The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English translated by Geza Vermes
  • The Complete English Poems by John Donne
  • The Complete English Poems by George Herbert
  • The Complete Essays by Michel de Montaigne
  • The Complete Fables by Aesop
  • The Complete Fairy Tales by George MacDonald
  • The Complete Odes and Epodes by Horace
  • The Complete Plays by Christopher Marlowe
  • The Complete Plays, Lenz, and Other Writings by Georg Büchner
  • The Complete Poems by William Blake
  • The Complete Poems by Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  • The Complete Poems by John Keats
  • Complete Poems by D. H. Lawrence
  • The Complete Poems by Andrew Marvell
  • The Complete Poems by John Milton
  • Complete Poems by Marianne Moore
  • Complete Poems by Dorothy Parker
  • The Complete Poems by Christina Rossetti
  • The Complete Poems by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Complete Short Fiction by Oscar Wilde
  • Complete Short Stories by Graham Greene
  • Complete Stories by Kingsley Amis
  • Complete Stories by Dorothy Parker
  • Complete Writings by Phillis Wheatley
  • Con Men and Cutpurses: Scenes From the Hogarthian Underworld by Lucy Moore
  • The Conference of the Birds by Farid Ud-Din Attar
  • A Confession and Other Religious Writings by Leo Tolstoy
  • The Confession of a Child of the Century by Alfred de Musset
  • Confessions by St. Augustine
  • The Confessions by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Confessions of an English Opium Eater by Thomas De Quincey
  • The Confidence-Man by Herman Melville
  • Conjure Tales and Stories of the Colour Line by Charles W. Chesnutt
  • A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court by Mark Twain
  • The Conquest of New Spain by Bernal Díaz del Castillo
  • The Consolation of Philosophy by Boethius
  • Conversations of Socrates by Xenophon
  • The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  • Count Magnus and Other Ghost Stories by M. R. James
  • The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia by Philip Sidney
  • The Country of the Blind and Other Stories by H. G. Wells
  • The Country of the Pointed Firs and Other Stories by Sarah Orne Jewett
  • Cousin Bette by Honoré de Balzac
  • Cousin Phillis by Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Cousin Pons by Honoré de Balzac
  • Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Critias by Plato
  • The Crucible by Arthur Miller
  • The Cruise of the Snark by Jack London
  • Cup of Gold by John Steinbeck
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and Other Jazz Age Stories by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • The Custom of the Country by Edith Wharton
  • Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

D[edit]

  • D. H. Lawrence and Italy
  • Daddy-Long-Legs by Jean Webster
  • Daisy Miller by Henry James
  • D'Alembert's Dream by Denis Diderot
  • The Damnation of Theron Ware by Harold Frederic
  • The Damned by Joris-Karl Huysmans
  • Daniel Deronda by George Eliot
  • Dangerous Liaisons by Choderlos de Laclos
  • Dangling Man by Saul Bellow
  • Daphnis and Chloe by Longus
  • The Dark Eidolon and Other Fantasies by Clark Ashton Smith
  • Dashing Diamond Dick and Other Classic Dime Novels
  • David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  • De Anima by Aristotle
  • De Profundis and Other Writings by Oscar Wilde
  • A Dead Man's Memoir (A Theatrical Novel) by Mikhail Bulgakov
  • Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
  • Dear Enemy by Jean Webster
  • Death in Venice and Other Tales by Thomas Mann
  • Death of a Hero by Richard Aldington
  • The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories by Leo Tolstoy
  • The Death of Jim Loney by James Welch
  • The Death of King Arthur (Mort Artu)
  • Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller
  • The Decameron by Giovanni Boccaccio
  • Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh
  • The Deerslayer by James Fenimore Cooper
  • Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville
  • Demons by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Demosthenes and Aeschines (On the Embassy, On the Crown, Against Ctesiphon)
  • The Descent of Man by Charles Darwin
  • The Description of Wales by Gerald of Wales
  • The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the Early Christian Monks
  • Despair by Vladimir Nabokov
  • Desperate Remedies by Thomas Hardy
  • The Devils by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • The Dhammapada
  • Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion by David Hume
  • The Diaries of Samuel Pepys by Samuel Pepys
  • The Diary of Lady Murasaki by Murasaki Shikibu
  • Diary of a Madman and Other Stories by Nikolai Gogol
  • A Dictionary of the English Language: an Anthology by Samuel Johnson
  • Difficulties with Girls by Kingsley Amis
  • The Digest of Roman Law by Justinian
  • Discourse on Inequality by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Discourse on Method and Related Writings by René Descartes
  • Discourses by Epictetus
  • The Discourses by Niccolò Machiavelli
  • The Discovery of India by Jawaharlal Nehru
  • Dispatches for the New York Tribune by Karl Marx
  • The Distracted Preacher and Other Stories by Thomas Hardy
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 1: Hell by Dante Alighieri, translated by Dorothy Sayers
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 1: Inferno by Dante Alighieri, translated by Mark Musa
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 1: Inferno by Dante Alighieri, translated by Robin Kirkpatrick
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 2: Purgatorio by Dante Alighieri, translated by Mark Musa
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 2: Purgatorio by Dante Alighieri, translated by Robin Kirkpatrick
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 2: Purgatory by Dante Alighieri, translated by Dorothy Sayers
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 3: Paradise by Dante Alighieri, translated by Dorothy Sayers and Barbara Reynolds
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 3: Paradiso by Dante Alighieri, translated by Mark Musa
  • The Divine Comedy, Volume 3: Paradiso by Dante Alighieri, translated by Robin Kirkpatrick
  • Doctor Thorne by Anthony Trollope
  • Dr. Wortle's School by Anthony Trollope
  • A Dog's Heart by Mikhail Bulgakov
  • A Doll's House and Other Plays (The League of Youth, The Lady From the Sea) by Henrik Ibsen
  • Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens
  • Domesday Book, translated by Geoffrey Martin
  • Domestic Manners of the Americans by Frances Trollope
  • Don Juan by Lord Byron
  • Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
  • Don't Look Now and Other Stories by Daphne du Maurier
  • Doveglion: Collected Poems by José Garcia Villa
  • Dracula by Bram Stoker
  • The Dreams in the Witch House and Other Weird Stories by H. P. Lovecraft
  • Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • The Drinking Den (L'Assommoir) by Émile Zola

E[edit]

  • The Earliest English Poems
  • Early American Drama:The Contrast by Royall Tyler, André by William Dunlap, The Indian Princess by James Nelson Barker, The Gladiator by Robert Montgomery Bird, The Drunkard by William Henry Smith, Fashion by Anna Cora Mowatt, Uncle Tom's Cabin by George Aiken, The Octoroon by Dion Boucicault
  • Early American Writing
  • Early Christian Lives: Life of Antony by Athanasius; Life of Paul of Thebes, Life of Hilarion and Life of Malchus by Jerome; Life of Martin of Tours by Sulpicius Severus; Life of Benedict by Gregory the Great
  • Early Greek Philosophy
  • The Early History of Rome (Books I-V) by Titus Livy
  • Early Irish Myths and Sagas
  • Early Socratic Dialogues: (Ion, Laches, Lysis, Charmides, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Euthydemus) by Plato
  • Early Writings by Karl Marx
  • East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  • The Ecclesiastical History of the English People by Bede
  • Ecce Homo by Friedrich Nietzsche
  • Edgar Huntly by Charles Brockden Brown
  • The Education of Henry Adams by Henry Adams
  • Effi Briest by Theodor Fontane
  • Egil's Saga
  • Egyptian Book of the Dead, translated by E. A. Wallis Budge
  • Eichmann in Jerusalem by Hannah Arendt3
  • Either/Or by Søren Kierkegaard
  • Elective Affinities by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Electra and Other Plays (Ajax, Women of Trachis, Philoctetes) by Sophocles
  • The Emigrants by Gilbert Imlay
  • Emma by Jane Austen4
  • The End of the Affair by Graham Greene
  • England Made Me by Graham Greene
  • English Romantic Verse
  • The Enneads by Plotinus
  • Ennui by Maria Edgeworth
  • Enquiry Concerning Political Justice by William Godwin
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh, prose translation
  • The Epic of Gilgamesh, verse translation
  • Erewhon by Samuel Butler
  • The Erotic Poems (including Amores and Ars Amatoria) by Ovid
  • An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by John Locke
  • The Essays by Francis Bacon
  • Essays by Michel de Montaigne
  • Essays by Plutarch
  • Essays and Aphorisms by Arthur Schopenhauer
  • Essays in Idleness and Hojoki by Kenkō and Chōmei
  • Esther by Henry Adams
  • Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton
  • Eugene Onegin by Alexander Pushkin
  • Eugenie Grandet by Honoré de Balzac
  • The Europeans by Henry James
  • The Eustace Diamonds by Anthony Trollope
  • Evelina by Frances Burney
  • Exemplary Stories by Miguel de Cervantes
  • The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons by John Wesley Powell

F[edit]

  • The Fable of the Bees by Bernard Mandeville
  • Facundo by Domingo F. Sarmiento
  • The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser
  • A Fairly Honourable Defeat by Iris Murdoch
  • Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
  • The Fall of the House of Usher and Other Writings by Edgar Allan Poe
  • The Fall of the Roman Republic by Plutarch
  • The Fallen Idol by Graham Greene
  • Fantômas by Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre
  • Far from the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
  • Fasti by Ovid
  • Father and Son by Edmund Gosse
  • Fathers and Sons by Ivan Turgenev
  • Faust, Part I by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Faust, Part II by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  • Fear and Trembling by Søren Kierkegaard
  • The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay
  • Felix Holt, the Radical by George Eliot
  • The Female Quixote by Charlotte Lennox
  • The Fiddler of the Reels and Other Stories by Thomas Hardy
  • The Figure in the Carpet and Other Stories by Henry James
  • El Filibusterismo by José Rizal
  • First Love by Ivan Turgenev
  • Five Italian Renaissance Comedies:The Mandragora by Niccolò Machiavelli, Lena by Ludovico Ariosto, The Stablemaster by Pietro Aretino, The Faithful Shepherd by Giovanni Guarini and The Deceived by "Gl'Intronati"
  • Five Plays: (A Trick to Catch the Old One, A Chaste Maid in Cheapside, Women Beware Women, The Changeling, The Revenger's Tragedy) by Thomas Middleton
  • Five-and-Twenty Tales of the Genie by Śivadāsa
  • Flatland by Edwin A. Abbott
  • Flaubert in Egypt by Gustave Flaubert
  • Fools of Fortune by William Trevor
  • The Forest of Thieves and The Magic Garden: An Anthology of Medieval Jain Stories
  • Fortress Besieged by Qian Zhongshu
  • Fortunata and Jacinta by Benito Pérez Galdós
  • The Fortunes of Richard Mahony by Henry Handel Richardson
  • Forty Stories by Donald Barthelme
  • Four Comedies by Carlo Goldoni
  • Four Russian Plays (The Infant by Denis Fonvizin, Chatsky by Alexander Griboyedov, The Inspector General by Nikolai Gogol, Thunder by Alexander Ostrovsky)
  • Four Tragedies by Seneca
  • The Four Voyages of Christopher Columbus
  • Fourteen Byzantine Rulers (The Chronographia) by Michael Psellus
  • The Fox, The Captain's Doll, The Ladybird by D. H. Lawrence
  • Fragments by Heraclitus
  • Framley Parsonage by Anthony Trollope
  • Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  • The Frogs and Other Plays (The Wasps and The Poet and the Women) by Aristophanes
  • From Here to Eternity by James Jones

G[edit]

  • The Gambler, Bobok, A Nasty Story by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  • Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais
  • Gentlemen Prefer Blondes by Anita Loos
  • The Georgics by Virgil, translated by Kimberly Johnson
  • Germania by Tacitus
  • Germinie Lacerteux by Edmond and Jules de Goncourt
  • Ghosts and Other Plays (A Public Enemy and When We Dead Wake) by Henrik Ibsen
  • The Gilded Age by Mark Twain
  • Gisli Sursson's Saga and The Saga of the People of Eyri
  • Glory by Vladimir Nabokov
  • The God Boy by Ian Cross
  • God's Trombones by James Weldon Johnson
  • Going to Meet the Man by James Baldwin
  • The Golden Ass by Apuleius
  • The Golden Bowl by Henry James
  • The Golden Casket: Chinese Novellas of Two Millennia
  • The Golden Legend: Selections by Jacobus de Voragine
  • The Good Apprentice by Iris Murdoch
  • The Good Person of Szechwan by Bertolt Brecht
  • The Good Soldier by Ford Madox Ford
  • The Good Soldier Svejk and His Fortunes in the World War by Jaroslav Hašek
  • Gorgias by Plato
  • The Gospel of Wealth: Essays and Other Writings by Andrew Carnegie
  • Gothic Tales by Elizabeth Gaskell
  • Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners by John Bunyan
  • The Grandissimes by George Washington Cable
  • The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  • Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  • Greek Fiction (Chariton, Longus)
  • Greek Political Oratory (Thucydides, Lysias, Andocides, Isocrates, Demosthenes)
  • The Greek Sophists
  • Grundrisse by Karl Marx
  • The Guide by R. K. Narayan
  • Guide to Greece: Volume 1, Central Greece by Pausanias
  • Guide to Greece: Volume 2, Southern Greece by Pausanias
  • Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift3
  • Guy Mannering by Walter Scott
  • Guys and Dolls and Other Writings by Damon Runyon

H[edit]

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